de Havilland Sea Venom FAW Mk22 - XG691

de Havilland Sea Venom FAW Mk22

de Havilland Sea Venom FAW Mk22

de Havilland Sea Venom FAW Mk22

Technical Specifications

Chronology
  • The purchase and transportation of this aircraft to Malta was made possible thanks to a kind donation made by one of the Museum's strongest supporters David Dalton. This aircraft was previously owned by Jet Age Museum which was located in Staverton Airfield in the U.K.

  • XG691 arrived at Malta Aviation Museum on Monday 19th, September, 2005 in a dismantled state, following a land/sea journey on a 40 foot trailer directly from UK.

  • DH Sea Venom aircraft served the Royal Navy from 1954 to 1965 with No750 squadron stationed at Hal Far for navigation training. Squadron 750 was the last RN squadron to operate this type of aircraft.

  • The aircraft is currently in storage awaiting restoration.

 

 

Read about the Service History of Sea Venom FAW Mk22-XG691

 

Brief History

The Venom had come about after a UK Air Ministry requirement for a fast, manoeuverable and capable fighter-bomber (FB) to replace the de Havilland Vampire, a late Second World War-era aircraft. The Venom's lineage lay in the aircraft it was intended to replace, which had been the second jet aircraft to enter service with the RAF, after the Gloster Meteor which did see service during WWII. In most respects, the Venom was quite similar to the Vampire, which included the sharing of the distinctive twin-boom tail and composite wood/metal structure, though the Venom did differ in parts.

The Sea Venom first flew on 2nd September 1949. Although in service long before the Sea Vixen its DH 112 design number was later than that of the Sea Vixen DH110. Fitted with Ghost engine, it entered Royal Navy service in 1953. Sea Venom aircraft were in action throughout the Suez campaign of 1956. In total, some 393 Sea Venoms were produced.

The FAW.22 was the final Royal Navy variant and was powered by the de Havilland Ghost 105 turbojet engine. Thirty-nine of this type were built in 1957/58. Some were later fitted out with Firestreak AA missiles.

In, Malta, the aircraft served the Royal Navy No750 squadron stationed at Hal Far for navigation training. Squadron 750 was the last RN squadron to operate this type of aircraft.

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